Course Description

Explore the sociological perspectives that impact negative perceptions on race, identity and inter-group relations. Participants learn the impact of systems and institutions that support inequities, and the connection to privilege and power. In this certificate course, participants learn tools to use their voice, influence, and privilege to recognize opportunities to take a stand as they educate and encourage others to dismantle social and structural causes of inequality.

 

Skills You’ll Learn: 

  • How to identify systems of racism and discrimination
  • How power and privilege impact implicit bias responses
  • Identifying equity and equality imbalances in everyday life
  • How to become an anti-racist
  • Being an ally and actions to take

Key Concepts Covered Include:

  • American Racism: The Legal Evolution
    • At every step within the evolution of America, racism has been a structural foundation. The unofficial and then official business leaders and government have built and upheld racist policies to maintain the separation and unequal power between whites and all people of color. This video explores the history that shaped the evolution of race.
  • Colorblindness and other untruths

    • The idea that individuals and systems could or should simply “not see race” is a relatively new one in American history. But is it a positive stance or frame of reference? Or does one’s assertion to being “colorblind” dismiss the experiences and values of our racial identity? Explore other “untruths” that many hold, that should be debunked.
  • The Misunderstanding of White Privilege

    • The term “white privilege” is often misunderstood and comes with negative perceptions. It’s important to understand how power and privilege plays itself out on different levels, and how the sociology and negative perceptions of race and ethnicity perpetuates continued privileges.
  • Systems that Support Supremacy

    • Racism is systemic and structural. Systemic and structural racism are forms of racism that are pervasively and deeply embedded in systems, laws, written or unwritten policies. This has resulted in inequitable practices allowing the unfair treatment, adverse consequences, and oppression of people of color.
  • Disruptive Discussion: White Privilege & White Fragility

    • Racism is systemic and structural. Systemic and structural racism are forms of racism that are pervasively and deeply embedded in systems, laws, written or unwritten policies. This has resulted in inequitable practices allowing the unfair treatment, adverse consequences and oppression of people of color.
  • Becoming an Ally, it’s a VERB!

    • In this episode of DISRUPTIVE DISCUSSIONS, D.Z. Swift and Dion Jordan talk about what it means to be an ally. It’s more than identifying discriminatory behaviors in others or wanting to support people when discrimination and oppression occurs. Being an ally is a VERB, which means action.
  • What is anti-racism?

    • Anti racism is not only believing in racial equity but actively and strategically making changes to a social system that has been built upon the oppression and discrimination of people based on their race and/or ethnicity. An antiracist is an advocate for and an ally to those who are commonly disenfranchised and marginalized. So, if you’re an anti-racist you speak up when you see an act of discrimination because you believe that all people have the same rights to fair treatment and justice. Anti racism consciously aims to take actions against such beliefs and to dismantle the existing structures that have created and continue to support racism.

Certificate Requirements:

  • Certificate courses must be completed within 1 year of enrollment
  • Completing all required modules is mandatory during the outlined timeframe to be eligible to receive a certificate of completion.
  • Knowledge check completion at 75%+ is required to pass each module.

Professional Development Credits:

  • Certified by SHRM (Society for Human Resource Management)
  • 5 PDC’s



Who Should Enroll

Beginner – Intermediate Level

No DEI experience needed
Preferred understanding of DEI
principles and unconscious bias



Course Length & Effort

Approximate 2 weeks
(8 – 9 hours) to complete

5.5 hours of coursework
1.5 hours to complete worksheets
2 hours of case studies



Course Format

Flexible Schedule

On demand modules
Take when you’re ready to learn